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Anyone applied for a B1 visa at the US Embassy in Tokyo?

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  • Anyone applied for a B1 visa at the US Embassy in Tokyo?



    Since most of my friends in Japan don't need to bother with visas when visiting the US for work, I am unable to get any information on this matter.

    I'm supposed to go the US next month for a short term training program sponsored by my employer (Japanese branch of an American company). Is the visa approval process 10.0.0.0.1 192.168.1.254 truly as random as people on the internet say? Does anyone here have any experience taking the interview in Tokyo?

    I'm Indian - and going by the accounts of people who took the interview at an US embassy / consulate in India, the refusal rate is quite high there. I wonder if I am going to be subject to a higher degree of scrutiny, especially given the fact that my ties to my home country are evidently quite low (living alone in a foreign country)
    Last edited by Temba; 01-21-2022, 09:09 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Temba View Post

    Since most of my friends in Japan don't need to bother with visas when visiting the US for work, I am unable to get any information on this matter.

    I'm supposed to go the US next month for a short term training program sponsored by my employer (Japanese branch of an American company). Is the visa approval process 10.0.0.1
    transmitter
    ​ truly as random as people on the internet say? Does anyone here have any experience taking the interview in Tokyo?

    I'm Indian - and going by the accounts of people who took the interview at an US embassy / consulate in India, the refusal rate is quite high there. I wonder if I am going to be subject to a higher degree of scrutiny, especially given the fact that my ties to my home country are evidently quite low (living alone in a foreign country)
    The visa approval process for the US can vary based on multiple factors, including your nationality, purpose of travel, and individual circumstances. While it's not entirely random, it can feel unpredictable due to the subjective nature of visa decisions.

    Your experience at the US Embassy or Consulate in Tokyo may differ from those in India, as each location has its own procedures and considerations. Being from India may subject you to closer scrutiny, especially if you're perceived as having weaker ties to your home country.

    To improve your chances, be prepared to demonstrate strong ties to India, such as stable employment, property ownership, family connections, or other commitments that indicate your intention to return after your training program. Providing clear documentation and answering interview questions confidently can also help.

    Ultimately, the decision rests with the consular officer reviewing your application, but presenting a well-prepared and genuine case can increase your chances of approval.​

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    • #3
      Visa approval depends on individual circumstances, but it is not random. The process considers your purpose of visit, ties to your home country, and ability to support yourself in the US.

      You should show significant ties to your home country, such as secure work, property ownership, family connections, or other commitments that would force you to return after training. Living alone abroad may raise issues about your plan to return to India following training.

      For Tokyo interviews, ask those who have done them. They can reveal US embassy or consulate in Tokyo needs and expectations.

      If you have questions about the visa application procedure, your employer or a lawyer can advise you.

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