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US C-1/D Crewmember visa for leisure transit

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  • US C-1/D Crewmember visa for leisure transit



    A friend of mine works on cruise ships, and has a C-1/D visa for that purpose.

    She now wants to fly to the UK to visit us, and the best ticket prices involve getting a connecting flight in the USA, some of them with a layover.

    I've searched and read everything I can find but I can't find anything other than vague answers. The question is:
    Does the C-1 part of her existing visa cover her for transit in this scenario? Or does she need to apply for a separate visa to cover this journey?

    She's a Mexican national and resident, so not eligible for a waiver.
    Last edited by kohramach; 02-04-2024, 02:05 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by kohramach View Post

    A friend of mine works on cruise ships, and has a C-1/D visa for that purpose.

    She now wants to fly to the UK to visit us, and the best ticket prices involve getting a connecting flight in the USA, some of them with a layover.

    I've searched and read everything I can find but I can't find anything other than vague answers. The question is:
    Does the C-1 part of her existing visa cover her for transit in this scenario? Or does she need to apply for a separate visa to cover this journey?

    She's a Mexican national and resident, so not eligible for a waiver.
    If the layover is less than 24 hours and she remains airside (without clearing customs and immigration), the C-1 part typically suffices.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by alexcray View Post

      If the layover is less than 24 hours and she remains airside (without clearing customs and immigration), the C-1 part typically suffices.
      There is no such thing as "without clearing customs and immigration" in the US. Everyone must clear customs and immigration immediately upon arriving in the US.

      This is my personal opinion and is not to be construed as legal advice.

      Comment


      • #4
        Unfortunately, the situation regarding your friend's C-1/D visa and transit through the US for a UK visit is complex and doesn't have a straightforward answer. While the C-1 visa allows for transit through the US, several factors influence its applicability in this scenario:
        1. Layover duration: Generally, a C-1 visa permits brief, uninterrupted transits, meaning minimal layovers (usually a few hours) only for catching connecting flights. Longer layovers might be considered entering the US, requiring a separate visa.
        2. Activities during layover: Leaving the transit area, even for seemingly simple things like grabbing food or using the restroom outside the secure zone, could be interpreted as entering the US, necessitating a visa.
        3. Country reciprocity: Each country has a reciprocal agreement with the US regarding visa requirements. For Mexican citizens, unfortunately, no waiver program exists, meaning a separate visa may be necessary.

        Given these factors, it's highly recommended to seek clarification directly from the US Embassy or Consulate in Mexico. They can assess your friend's specific situation, considering her itinerary, layover duration, and planned activities, to determine if her C-1/D visa suffices or if a separate visa application is needed.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by kohramach View Post

          A friend of mine works on cruise ships, and has a C-1/D visa for that purpose.

          She now wants to fly to the UK to visit us, and the best ticket prices involve getting a connecting flight in the USA, some of them with a layover.

          I've searched and read everything I can find but I can't find anything other than vague answers. The question is:
          Does the C-1 part of her existing visa cover her for transit in this scenario? Or does she need to apply for a separate visa to cover this journey?

          She's a Mexican national and resident, so not eligible for a waiver.
          The key factor is the nature of the layover. A short layover for a connecting flight is generally considered "transit in immediate and continuous transit," which the C-1 visa might cover. However, a longer layover where she leaves the airport might require a separate B-1/B-2 visa (tourist visa).

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by kohramach View Post

            A friend of mine works on cruise ships, and has a C-1/D visa for that purpose.

            She now wants to fly to the UK to visit us, and the best ticket prices involve getting a connecting flight in the USA, some of them with a layover.

            I've searched and read everything I can find but I can't find anything other than vague answers. The question is:
            Does the C-1 part of her existing visa cover her for transit in this scenario? Or does she need to apply for a separate visa to cover this journey?

            She's a Mexican national and resident, so not eligible for a waiver.
            A C-1/D visa is typically issued to crew members like your friend. The C-1 portion allows for transit through the USA to join the vessel they work on (the D part).

            Comment


            • #7
              C-1/D visa likely covers her. Recommend checking with airline/CBP [US Customs and Border Protection] for specifics. Mexican nationality usually requires transit visa unless under Visa Waiver Program, but C-1 seems to function similarly.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by kohramach View Post

                A friend of mine works on cruise ships, and has a C-1/D visa for that purpose.

                She now wants to fly to the UK to visit us, and the best ticket prices involve getting a connecting flight in the USA, some of them with a layover.

                I've searched and read everything I can find but I can't find anything other than vague answers. The question is:
                Does the C-1 part of her existing visa cover her for transit in this scenario? Or does she need to apply for a separate visa to cover this journey?

                She's a Mexican national and resident, so not eligible for a waiver.

                In general, holders of a C-1/D visa are allowed to transit through the United States for purposes related to their employment on a cruise ship or other vessel. However, the specific conditions and restrictions may vary depending on the individual's circumstances and the terms of their visa. It's advisable for your friend to contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate or consult with an immigration attorney to confirm whether her existing C-1/D visa permits transit through the U.S. for the purpose of connecting flights, especially considering her nationality and residency status.​

                Comment


                • #9
                  The C-1/D visa does not cover transit through the USA for non-crew purposes. She will need to apply for a C-1 transit visa specifically for this journey. Since she is a Mexican national and not eligible for the Visa Waiver Program, obtaining the correct visa is essential omegle and owespeedtest to avoid any travel issues.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kohramach View Post

                    A friend of mine works on cruise ships, and has a C-1/D visa for that purpose.

                    She now wants to fly to the UK to visit us, and the best ticket prices involve getting a connecting flight in the USA, some of them with a layover.

                    I've searched and read everything I can find but I can't find anything other than vague answers. The question is:
                    Does the C-1 part of her existing visa cover her for transit in this scenario? Or does she need to apply for a separate visa to cover this journey?

                    She's a Mexican national and resident, so not eligible for a waiver.
                    The C-1 portion of the visa is meant for brief and continuous transit through the US, with the main purpose being travel to another country. Layovers are generally allowed, but they shouldn't be excessive.

                    Comment

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