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  • devraj420
    replied
    hi did service request and got this reply on email
    "We have received your service request and researched the status of your case. We have had to perform additional review and this has caused a delay in processing time. Your case is currently with an adjudicating officer. You should receive a decision or notice of further action within 60 days." does this mean i will get my case approval in 60 days or its just a bs reply .
    asylum approved:08/28/2019
    i-485 -08/28/2019
    case transfered : 06/18/2020
    Last edited by devraj420; 07-15-2020, 05:37 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • luckycharm4111
    replied
    Originally posted by Sahil728 View Post
    Hi Everyone.
    i have RTD which is valid till Dec2020. Can i still apply for renewal as it takes around 4-5 months to get a renewal. My i485 is still pending with USCIS
    I guess you can do with your I-485 receipt (RTD Fee wavier) but the only thing is you need to send them your original RTD as it is still valid.

    If you apply after your RTD expires then you don't have to send your RTD documents.
    Last edited by luckycharm4111; 07-15-2020, 01:17 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sahil728
    replied
    Hi Everyone.
    i have RTD which is valid till Dec2020. Can i still apply for renewal as it takes around 4-5 months to get a renewal. My i485 is still pending with USCIS

    Leave a comment:


  • luckycharm4111
    replied
    Originally posted by Jasmine22 View Post
    Hey Friends,

    Has anyone applied for Travel Documents lately?

    Im waiting for my travel document since the beginning of February.. over 5 months.. it’s obviously over that processing time already..

    The pending I-485 since March 2019 is another deep pain..17 months and still going.. This really shouldn’t be that complicated...

    17 months is 1/5 of the citizenship’s 5 years waiting time! How much longer could this go for??

    I applied for RTD in February ending and its been almost 5 months.

    The last update was Fingerprint were taken on May 10.

    No updates yet ......

    I am expecting to hear something by next month hoping congress funds USCIS from being furloughed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jasmine22
    replied
    Hey Friends,

    Has anyone applied for Travel Documents lately?

    Im waiting for my travel document since the beginning of February.. over 5 months.. it’s obviously over that processing time already..

    The pending I-485 since March 2019 is another deep pain..17 months and still going.. This really shouldn’t be that complicated...

    17 months is 1/5 of the citizenship’s 5 years waiting time! How much longer could this go for??


    Leave a comment:


  • Trinity01
    replied
    Originally posted by Sahil728 View Post
    I think there printer has started working as i just recieved an email that they have shipped my son's passport
    Congrats!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sahil728
    replied
    I think there printer has started working as i just recieved an email that they have shipped my son's passport

    Leave a comment:


  • lolo858585
    replied
    Originally posted by Jasmine22 View Post
    Hey Guys,

    I have actually just found an I-485 case that was filled on March 20, 2019, at TSC, which was approved on June 30th, 2020.

    I have also filled on March 20, 2019, but still have not got any decisions. Also, it looks like there are not that many I-485 cases to be adjudicated at TSC if following the Tracker app.

    My conclusion is that they process some cases, but slowly and If the furlough happens, then it is official that all the cases will be delayed at least till the end of the year since Mr. Trump has prohibited any visas until the end of this year (If I am not mistaking).

    I have also just left the Senator's office after two requests from the Congressman, which resulted with a classic "your case is within the processing times" answer from USCIS.

    Opinions?
    Jasmine , I also saw a lot of cases got approved who filed after me ,however ,mostly they were emplyment-based so had the premium processing!!! i n t he Texas service center. I saw cases which were filed end of 2019 getting approved.

    however for 130 and asylum ,still pending.

    other centers like Nebraska's have already approved cases asylum and non-asylum based ! who filed 2019.

    apprently the waiting is long in the Texas center.

    Leave a comment:


  • PushPush
    replied
    Originally posted by Jasmine22 View Post
    Hey Guys,

    I have actually just found an I-485 case that was filled on March 20, 2019, at TSC, which was approved on June 30th, 2020.

    I have also filled on March 20, 2019, but still have not got any decisions. Also, it looks like there are not that many I-485 cases to be adjudicated at TSC if following the Tracker app.

    My conclusion is that they process some cases, but slowly and If the furlough happens, then it is official that all the cases will be delayed at least till the end of the year since Mr. Trump has prohibited any visas until the end of this year (If I am not mistaking).

    I have also just left the Senator's office after two requests from the Congressman, which resulted with a classic "your case is within the processing times" answer from USCIS.

    Opinions?
    That’s interesting, cause USCIS TSC received my case in January 2019, but no movement besides redone fingerprints in February 2020

    Leave a comment:


  • Trinity01
    replied
    Originally posted by Asylee Expert View Post
    AN INTERESTING ARTICLE BY THE WASHINGTON POST!

    “How the Trump administration is turning legal immigrants into undocumented ones -- by, uhh, literally turning off the printers that print the documents.”

    The Trump administration is turning legal immigrants into undocumented ones.

    That is, the “show me your papers” administration has literally switched off printers needed to generate those “papers.”

    Without telling Congress, the administration has scaled back the printing of documents it has already promised to immigrants — including green cards, the wallet-size I.D.’s legal permanent residents must carry everywhere to prove they are in the United States lawfully.

    In mid-June, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ contract ended with the company that had been printing these documents. Production was slated to be insourced, but “the agency’s financial situation,” USCIS said Thursday, prompted a hiring freeze that required it to ratchet down printing.

    Of the two facilities where these credentials were printed, one, in Corbin, Ky., shut down production three weeks ago. The other facility, in Lee’s Summit, Mo., appears to be operating at reduced capacity.

    Some 50,000 green cards and 75,000 other employment authorization documents promised to immigrants haven’t been printed, USCIS said in a statement. The agency said it had planned to escalate printing but that it “cannot speculate on future projections of processing times.” In the event of furloughs — which the agency has threatened if it does not get a $1.2 billion loan from Congress — “all agency operations will be affected.”

    Some of the missing green cards are for immigrants newly approved for legal permanent residency. Others are for existing permanent residents who periodically must renew their identity cards, which expire every 10 years but sometimes must be replaced sooner (for example, if lost). These immigrants have completed every interview, required biometric assessment, cleared other hurdles — and often waited years for these critical credentials.

    The Immigration and Nationality Act requires every adult legal permanent resident to carry their green card “at all times.” Failing to carry it is a misdemeanor, subject to jail time or fines. Immigrants must also show their green card to apply for jobs, travel or reenter the United States.

    Understandably, panicked immigrants have been inundating USCIS with calls seeking to locate their documents.

    “Our volume of inquiries [has] spiked concerning cases being approved, but the cards [are] not being produced,” said one agency employee. “A lot are expedite requests, and we can’t do anything about it; it’s costing people jobs and undue stress.”

    This employee added: “It really does frustrate a lot of us to not let applicants know what’s really going on.”

    Normally, within 48 hours of an applicant’s approval, USCIS’s online system indicates that a card has been printed. Immigration attorneys across the country have been puzzled recently because these status updates never appeared. Many thought the delays were tied to covid-19, which has caused other service disruptions.

    One Philadelphia attorney, Anu Nair, said a USCIS officer let slip in early June that all contractors were about to be laid off and to expect long delays with paperwork.

    Memphis-based attorney Elissa Taub inquired about her client’s missing green card and got a cryptic email: “The system has to be updated so that a card can be produced. You will receive the [card] in the mail once the system in updated [sic].”

    USCIS, which is funded almost entirely by fees, is undergoing a budget crisis, largely caused by financial mismanagement by political leadership. The printing disruptions are no doubt a preview of chaos to come if the agency furloughs about 70 percent of its workforce, as it has said it will do in a few weeks absent a congressional bailout.

    In recent conversations with congressional staffers about cutting contracts to save money, USCIS mentioned only one contract, for a different division, that was being reduced — and made no reference to this printing contract, according to a person who took part in those discussions. The company that had this contract, Logistics Systems Inc., did not respond to emails and calls this week requesting comment.

    The administration has taken other steps in recent months that curb immigration. Presidential executive orders have almost entirely ended issuance of green cards and work-based visas for people applying from outside the country; red tape and bureaucracy have slowed the process for those applying from within U.S. borders. For a while, the agency refused to forward files from one office to another. The centers that collect necessary biometric data remain shuttered.

    These pipeline delays are likely to dramatically reduce the number of green cards ultimately approved and issued this year.

    Under normal circumstances, immigrants who need proof of legal residency but haven’t yet received their green card would have an alternative: get a special passport stamp from USCIS. But amid covid-related changes, applicants must provide evidence of a “critical need,” with little guidance about what that means.


    “The bottom line is that applicants pay huge filing fees, and it appears that these fees have apparently been either squandered through mismanagement or diverted to enforcement-focused initiatives, to the great detriment of applicants as well as the overall efficiency of the immigration process,” says Anis Saleh, an immigration attorney in Coral Gables, Fla. “The administration has accomplished its goal of shutting down legal immigration without actually changing the law.”
    I am very disappointed and have no words. My thought is that maybe immigration situation will get better after the election... if people won’t vote for you know who...
    Last edited by Trinity01; 07-10-2020, 10:01 AM. Reason: Typo

    Leave a comment:


  • Asylee Expert
    replied
    AN INTERESTING ARTICLE BY THE WASHINGTON POST!

    “How the Trump administration is turning legal immigrants into undocumented ones -- by, uhh, literally turning off the printers that print the documents.”

    The Trump administration is turning legal immigrants into undocumented ones.

    That is, the “show me your papers” administration has literally switched off printers needed to generate those “papers.”

    Without telling Congress, the administration has scaled back the printing of documents it has already promised to immigrants — including green cards, the wallet-size I.D.’s legal permanent residents must carry everywhere to prove they are in the United States lawfully.

    In mid-June, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ contract ended with the company that had been printing these documents. Production was slated to be insourced, but “the agency’s financial situation,” USCIS said Thursday, prompted a hiring freeze that required it to ratchet down printing.

    Of the two facilities where these credentials were printed, one, in Corbin, Ky., shut down production three weeks ago. The other facility, in Lee’s Summit, Mo., appears to be operating at reduced capacity.

    Some 50,000 green cards and 75,000 other employment authorization documents promised to immigrants haven’t been printed, USCIS said in a statement. The agency said it had planned to escalate printing but that it “cannot speculate on future projections of processing times.” In the event of furloughs — which the agency has threatened if it does not get a $1.2 billion loan from Congress — “all agency operations will be affected.”

    Some of the missing green cards are for immigrants newly approved for legal permanent residency. Others are for existing permanent residents who periodically must renew their identity cards, which expire every 10 years but sometimes must be replaced sooner (for example, if lost). These immigrants have completed every interview, required biometric assessment, cleared other hurdles — and often waited years for these critical credentials.

    The Immigration and Nationality Act requires every adult legal permanent resident to carry their green card “at all times.” Failing to carry it is a misdemeanor, subject to jail time or fines. Immigrants must also show their green card to apply for jobs, travel or reenter the United States.

    Understandably, panicked immigrants have been inundating USCIS with calls seeking to locate their documents.

    “Our volume of inquiries [has] spiked concerning cases being approved, but the cards [are] not being produced,” said one agency employee. “A lot are expedite requests, and we can’t do anything about it; it’s costing people jobs and undue stress.”

    This employee added: “It really does frustrate a lot of us to not let applicants know what’s really going on.”

    Normally, within 48 hours of an applicant’s approval, USCIS’s online system indicates that a card has been printed. Immigration attorneys across the country have been puzzled recently because these status updates never appeared. Many thought the delays were tied to covid-19, which has caused other service disruptions.

    One Philadelphia attorney, Anu Nair, said a USCIS officer let slip in early June that all contractors were about to be laid off and to expect long delays with paperwork.

    Memphis-based attorney Elissa Taub inquired about her client’s missing green card and got a cryptic email: “The system has to be updated so that a card can be produced. You will receive the [card] in the mail once the system in updated [sic].”

    USCIS, which is funded almost entirely by fees, is undergoing a budget crisis, largely caused by financial mismanagement by political leadership. The printing disruptions are no doubt a preview of chaos to come if the agency furloughs about 70 percent of its workforce, as it has said it will do in a few weeks absent a congressional bailout.

    In recent conversations with congressional staffers about cutting contracts to save money, USCIS mentioned only one contract, for a different division, that was being reduced — and made no reference to this printing contract, according to a person who took part in those discussions. The company that had this contract, Logistics Systems Inc., did not respond to emails and calls this week requesting comment.

    The administration has taken other steps in recent months that curb immigration. Presidential executive orders have almost entirely ended issuance of green cards and work-based visas for people applying from outside the country; red tape and bureaucracy have slowed the process for those applying from within U.S. borders. For a while, the agency refused to forward files from one office to another. The centers that collect necessary biometric data remain shuttered.

    These pipeline delays are likely to dramatically reduce the number of green cards ultimately approved and issued this year.

    Under normal circumstances, immigrants who need proof of legal residency but haven’t yet received their green card would have an alternative: get a special passport stamp from USCIS. But amid covid-related changes, applicants must provide evidence of a “critical need,” with little guidance about what that means.


    “The bottom line is that applicants pay huge filing fees, and it appears that these fees have apparently been either squandered through mismanagement or diverted to enforcement-focused initiatives, to the great detriment of applicants as well as the overall efficiency of the immigration process,” says Anis Saleh, an immigration attorney in Coral Gables, Fla. “The administration has accomplished its goal of shutting down legal immigration without actually changing the law.”

    Last edited by ceci1073; 07-10-2020, 09:10 AM. Reason: link

    Leave a comment:


  • Jasmine22
    replied
    Hey Guys,

    I have actually just found an I-485 case that was filled on March 20, 2019, at TSC, which was approved on June 30th, 2020.

    I have also filled on March 20, 2019, but still have not got any decisions. Also, it looks like there are not that many I-485 cases to be adjudicated at TSC if following the Tracker app.

    My conclusion is that they process some cases, but slowly and If the furlough happens, then it is official that all the cases will be delayed at least till the end of the year since Mr. Trump has prohibited any visas until the end of this year (If I am not mistaking).

    I have also just left the Senator's office after two requests from the Congressman, which resulted with a classic "your case is within the processing times" answer from USCIS.

    Opinions?

    Leave a comment:


  • gtaid1
    replied
    I filed I-1485 in April 2020 to Nebraska as main applicant, is there anyone here with my timing?

    We should connect ! Message me!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sahil728
    replied
    Originally posted by luckycharm4111 View Post

    You are right, I don't see any movement at all.

    Probably they may be in depression of losing the jobs (Furlough ) in August and stopped working......
    That is not fair at all. At first they are processing at turtle's speed and now they just stopped doing anything.

    Leave a comment:


  • luckycharm4111
    replied
    Originally posted by Sahil728 View Post
    I have been tracking uscis case status and there has been no movement since past 2 weeks on any case. Have these people totally stopped working?
    You are right, I don't see any movement at all.

    Probably they may be in depression of losing the jobs (Furlough ) in August and stopped working......

    Leave a comment:

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