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  • Originally posted by Mouhannad View Post
    Hello everyone,
    my timeline is:
    - on May 16 2018 i-485 application receive to NSC (live in Portland, Oregon)
    - on October 31 2018 interview was done
    - the status now “Case was transferred for jurisdiction”
    I did submit 2-3 e-requests but the only response (pending).
    it’s now 18 months of waiting.
    a question for the people who got their approval after more than a year of the application, is it possible to receive the approval without retaking the medical, or They will ask me to take the medical again?

    Thanks
    1. Are you a primary or derivative asylee?
    2. How was your experience with interview? What did they ask?

    Comment


    • Originally posted by mekus21 View Post

      Is Thailand the country of persecution (COP) you claimed asylum from? If not, you may travel freely with your TD. However, the TD is NOT a US passport and if no visa is required for US citizens, you would need to obtain a Thai visa on your travel document to be able to use it to travel, because you are not yet a citizen.

      If Thailand is visa-free for Indian citizens, you still may be able to use your Indian passport to travel to Thailand. You need to understand that, and it was made clear by USCIS, all green card holders are free to travel the whole world with their national passport. A former asylee who adjusted to green card holder has voluntarily 'dis-availed' himself of his asylee status and its protections thereof, and has become a permanent resident just like others, and is free to travel around the world with their national passport or a TD if they choose. However, excessive multiple travels to and/or extended periods of stay in one's COP might be a possible cause for concern during the citizenship interview. One or two trips to COP isn't usually an issue at the N400 interview, especially if well explained why you had to travel and actions you took to keep yourself safe while there. Several permanent residents based on asylum with one or two trips to their COP have obtained citizenship recently without any issues whatsoever.

      https://my.uscis.gov/exploremyoption...anent_resident
      Thanks for your reply, but when ever i asked they say you are not able to use your national passport to travel if you are LPR in direct reason of asylum you have to use TD to travel.
      can i make appointment with immigration to confirm. i just asked one of the attorney he says we can travel but it could be problem its safe to travel on TD.....

      STILL CONFUSE....

      Comment


      • Originally posted by chaddhaaman View Post

        Thanks for your reply, but when ever i asked they say you are not able to use your national passport to travel if you are LPR in direct reason of asylum you have to use TD to travel.
        can i make appointment with immigration to confirm. i just asked one of the attorney he says we can travel but it could be problem its safe to travel on TD.....

        STILL CONFUSE....
        A lot of opinions exist as regards to this topic. Back to 10 years ago up until about 2016, it was safer to travel with TD for LPRs based on asylum. With revised USCIS policies, all LPRs (regardless of how it was gotten) are all safe to travel. LPRs based on asylum are also free to visit their COP, but frequent visits become suspicious and may be an issue if and when they apply for citizenship, as this gives USCIS one last chance to review your entire immigration records again and the frequent or extended COP visits might come up. Now if you plan to remain an LPR forever, visiting your COP may not be an issue but just not frequently. At the port of entry, not all border officials are up-to-date with this revised policy and some officials may illegally harass you at the POE for visiting your COP. Some former LPR friends of mine based on asylum are now citizens and their COP travel(s) was barely an issue at their N400 interview. 3 recently became citizens last and this month. A friend, LPR based on asylum, recently visited her COP and returned safely and later visited Canada and upon return to the US, the border official found her COP entry stamp on her passport and wanted to make an issue out of it but his supervisor came out and cleared her and educated him on the latest policy. She also returned safely as well. If you do eventually plan to apply for citizenship, I would keep my COP visits (if necessary) very brief, few and far between.

        At the end of the day, you decide which works for you.

        Comment


        • Hello, good people!

          Anyone received a GC from TSC recently? When did you file?

          I filed in May 2019, no news so far. Status states "processing".

          Comment


          • Originally posted by elena007 View Post
            Hello, good people!

            Anyone received a GC from TSC recently? When did you file?

            I filed in May 2019, no news so far. Status states "processing".
            TSC is taking about 12 months on average.

            Comment


            • Hello guys! It’s been almost one year of waiting game , I’m loosing my patience. My timeline: got approved on 12/7/2017 ( asylum based) , applied for GC on 11/30/2018 TSC .

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Fru-Fru View Post
                Hello guys! It’s been almost one year of waiting game , I’m loosing my patience. My timeline: got approved on 12/7/2017 ( asylum based) , applied for GC on 11/30/2018 TSC .
                I feel your pain! We applied on March 2018 still waiting!! That’s TSC!!!

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Sabinan View Post

                  I feel your pain! We applied on March 2018 still waiting!! That’s TSC!!!
                  I'd go to the Congressman and US Ombudsman if waiting more than a year. Doesn't hurt but might help

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by elena007 View Post
                    Hello, good people!

                    Anyone received a GC from TSC recently? When did you file?

                    I filed in May 2019, no news so far. Status states "processing".
                    Same here.

                    Applied GC in May 2019 at TSC

                    its been more than 180 days and no updates on my case yet.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by mekus21 View Post

                      A lot of opinions exist as regards to this topic. Back to 10 years ago up until about 2016, it was safer to travel with TD for LPRs based on asylum. With revised USCIS policies, all LPRs (regardless of how it was gotten) are all safe to travel. LPRs based on asylum are also free to visit their COP, but frequent visits become suspicious and may be an issue if and when they apply for citizenship, as this gives USCIS one last chance to review your entire immigration records again and the frequent or extended COP visits might come up. Now if you plan to remain an LPR forever, visiting your COP may not be an issue but just not frequently. At the port of entry, not all border officials are up-to-date with this revised policy and some officials may illegally harass you at the POE for visiting your COP. Some former LPR friends of mine based on asylum are now citizens and their COP travel(s) was barely an issue at their N400 interview. 3 recently became citizens last and this month. A friend, LPR based on asylum, recently visited her COP and returned safely and later visited Canada and upon return to the US, the border official found her COP entry stamp on her passport and wanted to make an issue out of it but his supervisor came out and cleared her and educated him on the latest policy. She also returned safely as well. If you do eventually plan to apply for citizenship, I would keep my COP visits (if necessary) very brief, few and far between.

                      At the end of the day, you decide which works for you.
                      Thanks...Mekus21, for your detailed explanation Thailand is not my COP i just want to go for vacation with family my son is in US army and based in S Korea another son is born citizen family from COP will also come there so that we can have good vacation that is the only concern. if i use TD do i need to obtain visa prior to visit cause Thailand offers visa on arrival for most of the countries.
                      Thanks a Lot for your suggestions.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by chaddhaaman View Post

                        Thanks...Mekus21, for your detailed explanation Thailand is not my COP i just want to go for vacation with family my son is in US army and based in S Korea another son is born citizen family from COP will also come there so that we can have good vacation that is the only concern. if i use TD do i need to obtain visa prior to visit cause Thailand offers visa on arrival for most of the countries.
                        Thanks a Lot for your suggestions.
                        You will need visa if you travel with TD no visa on arrival. And thAiland visa is easy to get one.

                        Comment


                        • This is a warning: DO NOT TRAVEL WITH THE PASSPORT ISSUED BY THE COUNTRY FROM WHICH YOU HAVE WON ASYLUM. If you wish to travel, Use the United States Refugee Travel Document (Form I-571) to travel. It works nicely, I have traveled to Bahamas, Dominican Republic, Amsterdam in the Kingdom of Netherlands and I am heading to Canada in December. The U.S. Refugee Travel Document (Form I-571) should be used by asylees and those who obtained permanent residency through asylum.

                          It is important that you know that after an asylee receives lawful permanent residency in the United States , returning to a country from which a person was granted asylum can potentially endangers that person's immigration status in the United States.

                          When I travelling to Amsterdam earlier in November 2019 on my return, I presented my Permanent Residency Card and my U.S. Refugee Travel Document (Form I-571). I was asked by the Immigration Officer where is my passport and I told her I was not able to use it. Her reply was good, and I asked her if I had have it on my person. She replied she would have confiscated it, I am not to use my national passport. That was my experience. To each his own, If you are having issues with travelling with your U.S. Refugee Travel Document, You are welcome to contact me regarding this through my inbox. I wish everyone well!

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Asylee Expert View Post
                            This is a warning: DO NOT TRAVEL WITH THE PASSPORT ISSUED BY THE COUNTRY FROM WHICH YOU HAVE WON ASYLUM. If you wish to travel, Use the United States Refugee Travel Document (Form I-571) to travel. It works nicely, I have traveled to Bahamas, Dominican Republic, Amsterdam in the Kingdom of Netherlands and I am heading to Canada in December. The U.S. Refugee Travel Document (Form I-571) should be used by asylees and those who obtained permanent residency through asylum.

                            It is important that you know that after an asylee receives lawful permanent residency in the United States , returning to a country from which a person was granted asylum can potentially endangers that person's immigration status in the United States.

                            When I travelling to Amsterdam earlier in November 2019 on my return, I presented my Permanent Residency Card and my U.S. Refugee Travel Document (Form I-571). I was asked by the Immigration Officer where is my passport and I told her I was not able to use it. Her reply was good, and I asked her if I had have it on my person. She replied she would have confiscated it, I am not to use my national passport. That was my experience. To each his own, If you are having issues with travelling with your U.S. Refugee Travel Document, You are welcome to contact me regarding this through my inbox. I wish everyone well!
                            This points to my previous post that not all border officials are up-to-date with the revised USCIS policy on asylee status and LPR status (based on asylum). According to the latest/revised USCIS manual, an asylee who willingly adjusts status from asylee to LPR is NO longer an asylee and loses the asylee protections thereof and has, thus, become an LPR just like others and could be deported to their COP if they, just like other LPRs, commit serious crimes that lead to revocation of their green cards. This is because unlike refugees who are mandated to apply for LPR status, an asylee is not mandated to apply for LPR status by law and doing so is optional. That is you can choose to remain an asylee forever, forgo LPR and potential citizenship benefits, and never get deported to COP no matter the circumstances or adjust to LPR, lose the asylee protections, risk being harmed if you do travel to COP, plus potential citizenship benefits. The USCIS revision made it clear that asylee and LPR (even based on asylum) are two different statuses. Before this revision, there was a specific paragraph on uscis.gov about asylee and LPR (based on asylum) travel to their COP but it since got taken out after the policy was revised and now mentions that ALL LPRs are safe to travel.

                            Now, the underlying presumption that one no longer fears persecution from their home country and may have obtained the asylum by false means still exists among USCIS officials and they will look out for this if and when you do apply for citizenship. Again, citizenship is not mandatory but optional and is considered a benefit. Thus an LPR (former asylee) who wishes to travel to their COP is free to do so, however they want to do so (especially if they choose to remain an LPR forever), but should be careful about doing this so often if they intend to ultimately become US citizens. Thus, when you apply for citizenship, the official is allowed to use their discretion to determine how the applicant obtained their gc and if it was necessary/valid. This applies to ALL N400 applicants. Marriage-based N400 applicants who are still married would have to prove that their marriage is still valid/was entered in good faith thus the gc is still valid, same way employment-based applicants would prove that their green cards were worth their employment at that time. Same stroke for former asylees. Once again, the official here is allowed to use their discretion in deciding when they encounter applicants with frequent and extended COP travels (say 3 to 5 times a year, 1 to 3 months stay per trip, for example) vs applicants with seldom COP travels (1 trip per year, 2 weeks stay per trip, for example). From experience, one or maybe two brief trips per year (if necessary) are usually not a problem, especially if you can give valid reasons about the travel. Better put, you are NOT barred from visiting COP but do it sparingly if you necessarily have to.

                            Like I said previously, not all officers are up-to-date on this policy. If I encountered such an official, I would ask to speak with her supervisor who would 're-educate' her on latest USCIS policies. By law, she cannot legally confiscate my passport for trifling reasons and that would be considered abuse of power. My lady friend in question had her passport and green card taken from her by the official (thinking she was not allowed to visit COP) to go speak with a supervisor and in less than a minute both officials came out with the supervisor handing over her docs back and telling her 'you're free to go' and educating the junior official on the latest policy. Some of these officials just have the old travel policies in mind.

                            https://cliniclegal.org/resources/bi...en-they-adjust
                            Asylees are able to adjust status after one year from the grant of asylum status pursuant to INA §209(b). But what happens to that asylum status after adjustment? The Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) recently answered that question where it held that after an asylum seeker adjusts status to become a lawful permanent resident, the prior asylum status has “terminated.” Matter of N-A-I-, 27 I&N Dec. 72 (BIA 2017).
                            Travel Outside of the U.S. as a Permanent Resident


                            Lawful permanent residents are free to travel outside the United States, and temporary or brief travel usually does not affect your lawful permanent resident status. To travel to a foreign country, you will need to present a passport and your Permanent Resident Card (Green Card).
                            https://my.uscis.gov/exploremyoption...anent_resident
                            Last edited by mekus21; 11-21-2019, 01:57 PM.

                            Comment


                            • Sabinan Thank you ! It’s really helpful when you realize that you are not the only one in such a situation. I think we’re all in the backlog. Do you guys think that the state of your residence also may cause the delay?( not only the service center) For future reference- my state is Georgia.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Fru-Fru View Post
                                Sabinan Thank you ! It’s really helpful when you realize that you are not the only one in such a situation. I think we’re all in the backlog. Do you guys think that the state of your residence also may cause the delay?( not only the service center) For future reference- my state is Georgia.
                                Agree on that . When you feel some support here it’s comforting. We are from New York. I have seen a lot of cases from New York were transferred to Texas. Originally all cases from New York were sent to Nebraska. This transfer made any good. Long waits . 1-3 years in Texas is waiting time for asylum based green card . Unfortunately

                                Comment

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